KMC Fourth Annual Symposium



RECHARGE, REBOOT, AND REIMAGINE: Innovating Peer Mediation


Week of April 12th-16th, 2021 at 3:30 - 5 PM PST each day


Register HERE


Monday, April 12th Doug Noll

Title: How to De-Escalate an Angry Person in 90 Seconds or Less

Description: In this 90-minute workshop, you will learn about Doug Noll’s counter-intuitive strategies for calming any angry person (or child) in literally seconds. His workshop is based on his best-selling book, De-Escalate: How to Calm an Angry Person in 90 Seconds or Less, available here: https://dougnoll.com/de-escalate-the-book

Bio: Douglas E. Noll, JD, MA left a successful career as a trial lawyer to become a peacemaker. His calling is to serve humanity, and he executes his calling at many levels. He is an award-winning author, teacher, trainer, and highly experienced mediator. Doug’s work carries him from international work to helping people resolve deep interpersonal and ideological conflicts to training life inmates to be peacemakers and mediators in maximum-security prisons. His website is https://dougnoll.com.


Tuesday, April 13th South Pasadena High School Peer Mediators

Title: Adapting and Evolving Peer Mediation Programs in an Online World

Description: This presentation will showcase South Pasadena High School’s Peer Mediation program and the ways in which the students in this program have actively worked to adapt, evolve, and expand their efforts in an online learning environment. More specifically, students will share their experiences in continuing their conflict resolution training in a virtual setting, advocating for mental health resources and support on campus, publishing a monthly zine centered around student voices, and last, but certainly not least, providing a platform for social justice issues to be both acknowledged and addressed in their school culture and community--all via Zoom!

Bios:


Andrew Cheung is an 18-year-old senior from South Pasadena High School. He joined the Peer Mediators his junior year of high school and is currently in his second year in the program. Andrew was drawn to becoming a Mediator because he wanted to create a safe and comfortable environment where all students can enjoy throughout their high school journey. His role in the program is to work in collaboration with the ASB Wellness Team to better provide health resources and activities for the students to engage in especially during these difficult times of the COVID-19 pandemic.





Sadie Metcalfe (she/her) is a 16-year-old junior from South Pasadena High School. She joined Peer Mediators in her freshman year, and rejoined again in her junior year, making this her second year in the program. Sadie was drawn to join Peer Mediators because of her aspiration to advocate for the mental health of her community and her peers. Sadie is the head of the Social Justice Committee. She and her committee advocate for justice on campus through resource compilation, panel discussions, and social media posts. SPHS Peer Mediators gives Sadie an opportunity to advocate for mental, physical, and sexual health at school.





Liam Serwin is an 18-year-old senior from South Pasadena High School. He joined the Peer Mediators in 8th grade, and is now in his 5th year of the program. Liam was drawn to Peer Mediators after a poor middle school experience, and wanted to make sure that no one had to go through the same. Liam is co-head of the Mental Wellness Committee. In this committee he and the members focus on students' mental health on campus through resources and working with the admin to try to better the school. Peer Mediators has allowed Liam to himself and others by advocating for mental health issues.







Adam Kwoh (he/him) is an 18-year-old senior from South Pasadena High School. He rejoined the Peer Mediators in his junior year, after first joining in 8th grade, to push for greater inclusivity and mental health resources in his high school community. Adam is head of the Zine & Art Committee, which gives a positive outlet for students by enabling them to submit their own art, writing, and videos for the Peer Mediators’ monthly magazine. Using his passion for writing and graphic design, Adam hopes to provide students with both inspiring and meaningful content that will encourage greater openness about mental health.








Joshua Ramirez is a 16-year-old junior from South Pasadena High School. He joined the Peer Mediators in 9th grade, in an effort to support the organization. Joshua was drawn to the Peer Mediators after being a member of the Upstanders during middle school. He wanted to create a better environment for the high school students of South Pasadena. Joshua is a member of the Zine & Art committee and regularly writes articles for the monthly issues on various topics. With his passion of learning history and writing, Joshua hopes to remind people of the lessons of the past in an effort to build a better future for all.

Rama Kadri is an English 9 and AP Literature teacher, as well as the advisor to the 20 student leaders who take part in the Peer Mediation program at South Pasadena High School. She is originally from the Midwest, and was a Peer Mediator herself in high school. She earned her bachelor's degree in English/French Secondary Education from Michigan State University before moving to California. Soon after moving to South Pasadena, she was asked by the student founder of the SPHS Peer Mediation program to continue to develop and expand the program following his graduation. She has had the pleasure of helping to facilitate the largely student run and led Peer Mediation program for the past three years, and is truly grateful to be doing so. Likewise, she feels fortunate to be a part of the KMC Community Board, and hopes to provide helpful resources to teachers, administrators, and school leaders as they work to initiate and/or further develop their own schools’ Peer Mediation programs.


Wednesday, April 14th Museum of Tolerance Emily Thompson

Title: Combat Hate: Youth Empowerment Online Description: Emily Thompson will share resources from the Museum of Tolerance's interactive Digital Empowerment Workshop, Combat Hate. This presentation will examine how young people are using digital spaces and social media, the types of prejudice and discrimination they may encounter online, and the opportunities they have to combat hate and build a more tolerant society as young changemakers.

Bio: Emily Thompson is the Associate Director, Research Department, for the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Museum of Tolerance. She came to the USA from the UK seven years ago after her completing her Masters, which examined

links between far-right movements and Holocaust denial. Since then, she has been researching international and domestic extremist ideologies and organizations for the Simon Wiesenthal Center as part of the Digital Terrorism and Hate project. She is currently leading the Museum’s newest program, Combat Hate, an interactive workshop that engages students in critical thinking for decoding and rejecting online hate.


Thursday, April 15th Ken Cloke

Title: The Art of Asking Questions

Description: There is no greater skill for mediators than the art of asking questions -- not the who, what, when, where type of questions that are usually asked, but the deeper questions that reveal some new element or facet of the problem that unexpectedly transforms it and makes it solvable; that exposes its hidden dynamics and suggests new paths forward. In this way, we can imagine conflict simply as the wrong set of questions -- questions for example that assume a single unambiguous truth where the problem contains two or more truths, which are deeply ambiguous and paradoxical. What we search for are questions that are at least as complex as the conflicts they want to clarify and resolve.

Through questions, it is possible to discover, in the thick of discord, how to free ourselves from its all-consuming grip, how to gain insight into what got us stuck, transform the ways we interact with our opponents, turn criticisms and complaints into openings for improvement, and evolve to higher levels of skill in conflict resolution. Through skillful questions we can begin to move into the heart of conflict and initiate open, honest, vulnerable conversations that allow people to work through their conflicts, where resolution, transformation, and transcendence suddenly, inexplicably, exquisitely unfold.

Bio: Kenneth Cloke is Director of the Center for Dispute Resolution and a mediator, arbitrator, facilitator, coach, consultant and trainer, specializing in communication, negotiation, and resolving complex multi-party disputes, including marital, divorce, family, community, grievance and workplace disputes, collective bargaining negotiations, organizational and school conflicts, sexual harassment, discrimination, and public policy disputes; and designing preventative conflict resolution systems.

His facilitation, coaching, consulting, and training practice includes work with leaders of public, private and non-profit organizations on effective communications, dialogue, collaborative negotiation, relationship and team building, conflict resolution, leadership development, strategic planning, designing systems, and organizational change.

He is an internationally recognized speaker and author of Mediation: Revenge and the Magic of Forgiveness; Mediating Dangerously: The Frontiers of Conflict Resolution; The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey into the Heart of Dispute Resolution; Conflict Revolution (1s and-2nd Editions); and The Dance of Opposites: Explorations in Mediation, Dialogue and Conflict Resolution Systems Design; Politics, Dialogue and the Evolution of Democracy; Words of Wisdom; and co-author with Joan Goldsmith of Thank God It’s Monday! 14 Values We Need to Humanize the Way We Work; Resolving Personal and Organizational Conflict; The End of Management and the Rise of Organizational Democracy; The Art of Waking People Up: Cultivating Awareness and Authenticity at Work; and ResolvingConflicts At Work: Ten Strategies For Everyone On The Job (1st-3rd Editions).

His university teaching includes mediation, law, history, political science, conflict studies, urban studies, and other topics at several colleges and universities. He is or has recently been an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University School of Law; Southern Methodist University; USC, Global Negotiation Insight Institute at Harvard Law School and Omega Institute; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Cape Cod Institute; University of Amsterdam ADR Institute; Saybrook University; Massey University (New Zealand). He has done conflict resolution work in Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Brazil, Canada, China, Cuba, Denmark, England, Georgia, Greece, India, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Puerto Rico, Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, USSR, and Zimbabwe. He is founder and first President of Mediators Beyond Borders.

He served as an Administrative Law Judge for the California Agricultural Labor Relations Board and the Public Employment Relations Board, a Factfinder for the Public Employment Relations Board, and a Judge Pro Tem for the Superior Court of Los Angeles. He has been an Arbitrator and Mediator for over forty years in labor management disputes, and is a member of a number of arbitration panels.

He received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley; J.D. from U.C. Berkeley’s Boalt Law School; Ph.D. from U.C.L.A.; LLM from U.C.L.A. Law School; and did post-doctoral work at Yale University School of Law. He is a graduate of the National Judicial College and has taken graduate level courses in a variety of subjects.


Friday, April 16th The KMC Community Executive Board/Peer Mediation Community Partners including Special Guests: Western Justice Center and APADRC

Title: Resources and Adapting to Move Forward with Peer Mediation







KMC Community Executive Board

Sarai Benitez, KMC Community Co-President, first became involved with Peer Mediation her junior year of High School, after she had gone through traumatic bullying. In her first year, she mediated over 50 students with her fellow mediators, earning her new problem-solving skills, and deepening her compassion. Wanting to help more, Sarai began to take on more referrals, including from people who felt they had a conflict with themselves. She found that students felt much more safe and comfortable speaking to a peer about their emotions instead of a staff member. By the time she graduated high school, Sarai felt that Peer Mediation completely changed her life. Sarai is now a college junior pursuing a career in Music Therapy at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) and continues to use the skills she learned through peer mediation in her verbal therapeutic intervention training. Sarai plans to continue her education towards a Masters in Arts Management focused on serving the diverse population in LA and develop her Korean language skill and cultural understanding through her local community center and at Los Angeles City College (LACC). With this major, Sarai plans to fight towards breaking the mental health stigma in both the Latinx and Korean communities in Los Angeles beginning in the Pico-Union and Koreatown area, which she grew up.

Sein Yun, KMC Community Co-President, is a current junior at the Orange County School of the Arts, where she has founded the Peer Mediation Program with the guidance of one of her school’s deans, Dr. Gregory Endelman. She was first inspired to begin a peer mediation organization at her school after observing the lack of education and discussion between conflicting groups of students. Although students were disciplined by the school administration, Sein has noticed that there were no conversations that allowed students to understand what they could have done differently to avoid such conflicts and learn how to tackle disputes in the future. She has introduced peer mediation to her school in order to foster such understanding and discussions among students and to create a more welcoming environment. As an alternative to the unusual circumstances the pandemic has brought, Sein developed an app for students at her school to explore mental health-related resources and to privately text peer mediators for help and advice, while continuing to hold Zoom peer mediation sessions. Sein is also working with her school’s Coalition for Antiracism and Inclusion to foster conversations between groups of students regarding race and diversity. In addition to peer mediation, Sein is an avid violin player and was selected as a violinist for the National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America sponsored by Carnegie Hall and will soon feature as a soloist on NPR Radio’s show “From the Top.”

Lizbeth Crispin started her peer mediator journey as a sophomore at University High School. Always wanting to help her community and peers in any way she could, she soon realized that the mediation skills she learned through her training could not only help others in an educational setting but in life in general. Lizbeth earned her two B. A. Degrees in Biology and Public Health and Health Equity from Mills College. Always being passionate about peer mediation and helping her community, Lizbeth decided to help pioneer a peer mediation program as a subset to another program in her college’s biology department. Lizbeth plans on continuing to assist others in learning about peer mediation with the help of the KMC community.


Will Hoadley-Brill has always been a peacemaker. When he was 10-years-old, he founded an anti-bullying program at his elementary school called the "Peace Team." When Will entered middle school, he was a founding member of the peer mediation program called the "Upstanders." He brought his mediation skills to high school and reinstated the peer mediation program there as well. Will graduated from South Pasadena High School in 2018 as a Valedictorian and is planning on graduating from The George Washington University in May of 2021 with a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and Peace Studies. He is simultaneously enrolled in a Masters of Education program at the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at GW which he plans to graduate from in 2022. He plans on using his communication and listening skills that he learned as a mediator as an educator in the future.

Rama Kadri is an English 9 and AP Literature teacher, as well as the advisor to the 20 student leaders who take part in the Peer Mediation program at South Pasadena High School. She is originally from the Midwest, and was a Peer Mediator herself in high school. She earned her bachelor's degree in English/French Secondary Education from Michigan State University before moving to California. Soon after moving to South Pasadena, she was asked by the student founder of the SPHS Peer Mediation program, Will Hoadley-Brill, to continue to develop and expand the program following his graduation. She has had the pleasure of helping to facilitate the largely student-run and led Peer Mediation program for the past three years, and is truly grateful to be doing so. Likewise, she feels fortunate to be a part of the KMC Community Board, and hopes to provide helpful resources to teachers, administrators, and school leaders as they work to initiate and/or further develop their own schools’ Peer Mediation programs.

Western Justice Center Team


Shaune Gatlin is the Director of Conflict Resolution Education Programs at WJC. For nearly 20 years, Ms. Gatlin ran the Los Angeles County Bar Association (LACBA)’s Dispute Resolution Services peer mediation program. She has experience in Restorative Justice working with Centinela Youth Services coordinating the Mediation programs the Victim Offender Restitution and Family Mediation Services. Her educational background is in Psychology from Cal State University Long Beach. She also brings many years of experience in youth leadership development with the YMCA and Boys & Girls Club movements. Shaune’s passion is working with youth and helping them become the leaders of tomorrow.





Arturo Magaña is the Conflict Resolution Education Programs Coordinator at WJC. He has over 10 years working in public schools in Los Angeles County, assisting after school programs, community school systems, and guidance and support for foster youth. He served as the Co-Chair for the Institute for Educational Leadership’s Coordinators’ Network, where he worked alongside other Community School Coordinators across the country and Canada on educational equity initiatives. He has a Bachelor’s in Criminal Justice from Westwood College, a Master’s in Guidance Counseling from Loyola Marymount University, and a Masters of Public Administration at CSU Long Beach.





Asian Pacific American Dispute Resolution Center (APADRC) Team

Christina Kataoka currently serves as interim executive director of the Asian Pacific American Dispute Resolution Center (APADRC), where she oversees the development, implementation, and outreach of the APADRC’s current and new programs including the APADRC’s Community Mediation Program, Restorative Justice and Peer Mediation Program, and Conflict Resolution Skills Training Program. Additionally, Ms. Kataoka also works as business consultant under Archer Communications, LLC, a company she founded in 2015.

Ms. Kataoka is a bilingual Mandarin-English mediator, trainer, speaker, and entrepreneur. Half Japanese and half Polish-American, Ms. Kataoka’s life-long dedication to ADR started when her mother moved the family to Southwestern China to develop China’s horticulture industry in 1995. With limited local support, her mother’s deficient cultural understanding and language skills caused Ms. Kataoka to take on the role of interpreter, negotiator, and cultural mediator for her mother’s business at an early age, resulting in her mother’s acceptance of the China Friendship Medal awarded by President Jiang Zemin in 1999.

Ms. Kataoka’s experience leading trade shows and training staff, guiding foreign experts on nation-wide tours, negotiating strategic business alliances, and later working in private equity, allowed her to identify the acute differences between China and the US and taught her the value of hard work and being a self-starter. Ms. Kataoka received her BA from St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, her JD from the University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law, and her MDR from Pepperdine University School of Law, Straus Institute for Dispute Resolution. Ms. Kataoka believes that community peacebuilding through ADR skills and services development is the key to bridging cultural gaps and evolving in the 21st century.